History

For over 35 years Su Casa has protected families from domestic violence. The agency was founded in 1979 by Petra Medelez, a survivor, who out of her own home took crisis calls and housed victims and their children. Petra’s vision was to fill her community with peaceful homes. In order to truly realize her vision, Su Casa expanded its services to include not only immediate shelter from danger but also case management and counseling (to residents and to victims still living with their batterer), shelter-based certified childhood education, community awareness training, and transitional housing. Su Casa remains dedicated to Petra’s belief that every individual has the right to live free from violence or the threat of violence.

Inherent in this belief is the agency’s commitment to the values of diversity and empowerment. Su Casa values each individual and embraces the ethnic and cultural diversity prevalent in Southern California. All direct service staff are bilingual (Spanish/English) and cultural competence is emphasized in staff training and practiced throughout all service modalities. Management continues to improve our programs and educate our staff to better serve the growing numbers of Asian and Pacific Islander victims seeking our help. The value placed on empowerment drives the agency’s ever-expanding range of services that are victim-centered. Services are practical, therapeutic, and educational.

The addition of the transitional shelter in 1996 is a direct response to the awareness that 30 days is not enough time for women to put the pieces of their lives back together in order to become self-sufficient and stable. This expansion is supported by research, showing that women who enter transitional shelters are far less likely to return to violent situations. The extended time enables families to bridge the gap between crisis and independent living. In addition, our continued efforts to enhance and expand outreach and counseling services to victims in the community who are not yet ready to take the step of leaving their batterer further exemplify the agency’s commitment to meet women where they are and help them achieve self-sufficiency on their own terms.

Take a look at the timeline below…